Surrey Carpentry

Professional Carpentry & Joinery Service

Built-in Cabin Bed with Drawers, Guildford, Surrey

Built-in Childrens Cabin Bed with Drawers, Guildford, Surrey

Built-in Childrens Cabin Bed with Drawers, Guildford, Surrey

This cabin bed was built to replace an existing one that could not be positioned under the window illustrated because of it’s size.

With the cabin bed being under the window, the space in the room was put to much better use, and good use of space was also achieved by incorporating drawers, cupboards and a slide-out bookcase into the cabin bed itself.

Positioning the batons

Positioning the batons

Positioning the batons

Positioning the batons

The initial framework for the drawers is set out

The initial framework for the drawers is set out

First of all, the batons that will support the built-in cabin bed are fixed to the wall. Once these are in place, the main slat rail can be positioned between the two walls at either end of the bed. With this in place, the framework for the drawers can be set out and placed. It is much easier to build the drawer carcass first of all, rather than later on when all the slats are fixed in place.

Drawers are fitted into the carcass

Drawers are fitted into the carcass

The slats, front and sides of the bed are positioned

The slats, front and sides of the bed are positioned

A small ladder will be fixed to the sliding bookcase

A small ladder will be fixed to the sliding bookcase

With the drawer carcass in place, the drawers could then be fitted using 450mm ball-bearing telescopic runners.

Next were the ends of the bed, which were fixed to the batons initially set out, before fitting the front of the bed into place. This had a cut out section to allow the user of the bed easy access. Below the cut-out was to be a small ladder made of pine which was attached to a small bookcase on castor’s that was able to roll in and out of  a compartment under the cabin bed. This worked well as good use of space as well as adding a little novelty!

The small bookcase and ladder on castors

The small bookcase and ladder on castors

The cupboard (or hiding place!)

The cupboard (or hiding place!)

The drawers next to the ladder

The drawers next to the ladder

Cabin beds… a great solution to space saving for grown ups, a great space station for kids!… or ship… or hideout… or cave…  :)

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February 22nd, 2011 by admin
Built in Fitted Wardrobe, Guildford, Surrey

Built in Fitted Wardrobe, Guildford, Surrey

Built in Fitted Wardrobe, Guildford, Surrey

This was a softwood (pine) and MDF floor to ceiling wardrobe with two sliding doors.

Inside was a single shelf, 1.8 metres high, with hanging space below, divided into two. The central divider gave the shelf strength and stopped it sagging over time.

The full height sliding doors on this fitted wardrobe were plain MDF, but some pleasant detail was added by fixing rectangles of small beading to them.

There is a pelmet at the top of the wardrobe to conceal the sliding door runners, whereas the sliding doors themselves are simply scribed to the wall and the skirting.

There was coving around the ceiling as well, but instead of cutting it away to make space for the wardrobe, I just scribed the timber around it. This way, if the wardrobe is ever taken out in the future, there won’t be any nasty holes to be patched up in either the skirting or the coving.

Batons fitted for shelves and divider

Batons fitted for shelves and divider

The divider is fitted

The divider is fitted

The shelf is fitted onto the divider, levelled by laser

The shelf is fitted onto the divider, levelled by laser

Marking out is always first, and then the batons are fixed to the wall, to which the MDF shelf and divider are fixed.

This is done using a laser level, a great tool to have!

The sliding doors are cut and fitted

The sliding doors are cut and fitted

Finally, the rectangles of softwood beading are fixed to the sliding doors

Finally, the rectangles of softwood beading are fixed to the sliding doors

After a great deal of attention to getting the top and bottom tracks of the sliding doors level and parallel, the pelmet can be fixed on to conceal the top track, and the wardrobe doors can be cut, scribed and hung.

Then finally the plain doors can be smartened up by fixing rectangles of beading to them.

A nice job, and a great use of space! :)

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February 22nd, 2011 by admin
Built in Fitted Wardrobe, Woking, Surrey

Built in Fitted Wardrobe, Woking, Surrey

Built in Fitted Wardrobe, Woking, Surrey

This job was for a customer who had just moved into the house, but didn’t have room for a wardrobe that had hinged doors, and needed a lot of storage space for clothes.

In this case the solution was to use sliding doors, with hinged cupboards above. They were to be painted, so it made sense to save money and use cheap materials like softwood and MDF.

As you can see in the picture to the left, this wardrobe has three sliding doors, with six hinged doors above them. It was 2.8 metres in total length. The large blank sliding doors were brought into proportion by fixing rectangles of bead to them, giving the effect of smaller doors matching the ones above.

Shelving and first stage of framework

Shelving and first stage of framework

The upper doors are fitted

The upper doors are fitted

The sliding doors are fitted and the beading is fixed to all doors

The sliding doors are fitted and the beading is fixed to all doors

First of all, was to mark out where the shelving was to be placed. These were for folded items such as shirts or jumpers (blokes stuff!) After that, the sides of the wardrobe needed to be scribed to the wall. This can be fairly time consuming if the house is old, which this one was! The walls were all over the place!

Once the wardrobe sides were scribed they were fixed to the wall using softwood baton. The shelves could now be cut and fitted into place including the main shelf along the total length to which the sliding door gear would fixed. A runner was then fitted directly below the top track of  the sliding door, to which the bottom track would be fixed. These needed to be absolutely horizontally parallel.

The upper doors were then fitted using cabinet hinges, and adjusted accordingly to even up the gaps between them.

The hanging rail was fitted next, which ran the entire length of the wardrobe, and was safely supported at intervals using brackets fixed to the shelf above. No-one like dresses in a mess on the floor!

Last of all, the sliding doors were cut and fitted, making sure there were the correct overlaps and stops, before the beading was then pinned on. With the beading pinned on, this fitted wardrobe really came together well.

A built-in fitted wardrobe is one of the best ways to use space in a bedroom, every last centimetre is put to good use. And there is the added bonus of not having to dust the top of them all the time! :)

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The converted office, with new worktops and bookcases

The converted office, with new worktops and bookcases

Home Office Conversion – Worktops, Bookcases and Filing cabinet, Shalford, Surrey

Its always nice to bring new life to a room that when you first enter it, has a strange damp smell, no electricity, and very little appeal whatsoever. This was exactly the case when we converted a damp, dank and dark old scullery in a grade 2 listed building in Shalford, Surrey into a well spaced out, attractive and useable home office for the family.

The room was already equipped with worktops made of slate and granite, and planning control stipulated that they must remain where they were, and not be touched, even though they had seen better days.

To soften and warm up the room ready for office use, the solution was to clad the existing stone worktops in 25mm Oak-faced MDF, which would be much more pleasant for day to day use.

In addition to this, we installed bookcases with adjustable shelving throughout the room, maximising the useable storage space, and also a bespoke fitted filing drawer cabinet system, described in detail HERE.

Main existing slate worktop

Main existing slate worktop

Other existing slat worktops

Other existing slate worktops

Other existing slate worktops

Other existing slate worktops

First "L" shaped section of oak-faced MDF being fitted

First "L" shaped section of oak-faced MDF worktop being fitted

First "L" shaped section of oak-faced MDF being fitted

First "L" shaped section of oak-faced MDF worktop being fitted

First "L" shaped section of oak-faced MDF worktop being fitted

First "L" shaped section of oak-faced MDF worktop being fitted

First of all, we got the oak-faced MDF worktops fitted.

To do this we had to establish where the highest point of the unlevel existing slate worktops was, and use that as the datum level to which the new oak MDF worktops would be set. The necessary packers were cut and placed, and the new worktops were then cut and scribed into position. The first worktop was the main “L” shaped one, which was made of three peices, all biscuit jointed, glued, and wound together with worktop connectors, seen above.

"L" shaped worktop fitted, and being wedged down

"L" shaped worktop fitted, and being wedged down

"L" shaped worktop fitted

"L" shaped worktop fitted

Worktops 3 & 4, 3 being the top of the filing cabinet, and 4 on packers, above existing slate worktop

Worktops 3 & 4, 3 being the top of the filing cabinet, and 4 on packers, above existing slate worktop

Worktops 2, 3 and 4, came after this, in clockwise fashion. Worktop 2 was essentially the base of one of the alcove bookcases, worktop 3 was the top of the filing cabinet, and worktop 4, pictured above, went onto the last of the slate surfaces, and had to be packed up by approximately 50mm to bring it to the same level as the rest of the worktops.

Fitted bookcases

Fitted bookcases

Electricity meter cabinet

Electricity meter cabinet

Electricity meter cabinet

Electricity meter cabinet

Once all the worktops were fitted, we attached solid oak lipping to the front edge of the oak-faced mdf to conceal both the mdf core and the stone worktops beneath. Of course the lipping on worktop 4 had to be much larger that the rest of the worktops due to the extra 50mm packers between the stone and the new worktop.

The next stage was to fit the bookcases onto the new worktops. These were done in plain MDF. We scribed the sides into place and fixed a fluted trim to the front of them, which would conceal the gaps between the adjustable shelves and the sides of the bookcase.

Once they were cut to size and lipped with softwood for a better finish, the 25mm thick mdf adjustable shelves were placed on “Tonk” inset shelving strip, which allows increments of about 15mm in adjustment, so they are very versatile.

We also housed the electricity meter below the main worktop in a small cabinet to conceal it, this was also done in oak-faced MDF.

The finished oak worktop bookcase

The finished oak worktop and bookcase

Bookcase above worktop 3 and filing cabinet

Bookcase above worktop 3 and filing cabinet

Bookcase above "L" shaped main worktop

Bookcase above "L" shaped main worktop

Bookcase on worktop 4, with its solid oak cornice, and side fluting

Bookcase on worktop 4, with its solid oak cornice, and side fluting

Finally the solid oak cornice was fitted to the bookcase above worktop 4, and it really put the finishing touch to the job. The reason you now see all the books and items already on the shelves is that we planned for the painters to come and paint the plain MDF parts of the job before we came back to fit the cornice, which took a little longer to get hold of from Mayford Joinery, Mayford, as they were quite busy at the time.

In this picture, you can also see the routed fluting down the side of the bookcase, which was the same on all the other bookcases.

All in all, this job was a great deal of work, but as always, it’s great to stand back and enjoy the result.

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